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Sunday, April 21 2024
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Mysuru

Mysuru: FIR against Great Bombay Circus for cutting birds’ wings

Bombay circus
Photo Credit : By Author

Mysuru: Police registered a case against Bombay Circus here on Monday October 10 followed by a complaint from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) India. The PETA in the complaint alleged that the proprietor of Great Bombay Circus has cut the wings of birds that were used in its performances, to prevent them from flying away.

The PETA India investigator further observed that the circus was also using dogs and birds to perform acts which were not registered with the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) – for instance, the dogs are made to walk sideways on their front legs on the edge of the ring, while the birds are made to pull a miniature cart as another bird balances on it.

The AWBI is the prescribed authority under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PCA) Act, 1960, which regulates the use of animals for performances in the country.

An FIR was registered at Nazarabad Police Station, Mysuru, for a cognisable offence under Section 429 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860, for maiming the birds. Further, the FIR also records a violation of Sections 3 and 11 (1) (a) (for causing unnecessary pain and suffering to animals, 11(1) (l) (for mutilation of birds), and Sections 26 and 38 (for performing unregistered acts/tricks) of the PCA Act, 1960. MP Maneka Gandhi also extended her support to get the FIR registered.

“To prevent birds from exercising their natural right of flying, circuses repeatedly lacerate birds’ wings and then jail them in cages,” says PETA India Deputy Director of Advocacy Projects Harshil Maheshwari. “PETA India urges families to support only those forms of entertainment which use consenting humans. Several AWBI inspections and numerous investigations by PETA India prove that animal circuses are cruel and in them, animals are continuously chained or confined to small, barren cages; deprived of veterinary care and adequate food, water, and shelter; and denied everything natural and important to them. Through physical abuse with weapons, they’re forced to perform confusing, uncomfortable, and even painful tricks. Many display stereotypic, repetitive behaviour indicative of extreme stress.

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